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28 Other Ways to Say That Makes Sense

28 Other Ways to Say That Makes Sense

That makes sense is a phrase that people frequently employ. However, there are many other ways to express “makes sense.” For example, some people might say “That follows logically” or “That falls in line with what I know.”

Another way to say makes sense is to use the words “tracks” or “tracks with.” Some people would say that a certain action tracks with how they imagine someone’s personality. In other words, it matches the image that they have of that person.

Another way to say makes sense is “is logical.” A logical belief or theory would follow traditional reasoning or principles. Logical beliefs are usually not written in stone; they can be changed by better information.

Some people would describe an idea as sensible, which means basically the same thing as making sense. Sensible ideas have a solid basis in conventional wisdom.

Another way to say makes sense is “holds water.” This expression has an old-timey feel, as if the speaker wants to imply that their idea is better than other people’s because it’s been around longer. This expression would be followed by an explanation of the idea and its worthiness.

Another way to say makes sense is “is well-founded.” A well-founded belief or idea has a strong basis in fact, reason, or experience. It would be very difficult to change a person’s mind about something that is well-founded.

Another way to say makes sense is “checks out.” This phrase could have two meanings: 1) a belief or idea is supported by the available evidence; 2) someone’s story seems to add up.

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Another way to say makes sense is “is lucid.” This word means basically the same thing as making sense, but it also carries a connotation of light and clarity. Someone who thinks something is logical or sensible might describe it as lucid.

Another way to say makes sense is “holds together.” This expression might be used by a speaker who feels insecure about their idea. It implies that the idea has a solid structure and would not fall apart if it were put under pressure.

Another way to say makes sense is “comports with.” A belief or idea comports with common sense if it is in line with what everyone already knows to be true.

Another way to say makes sense is “is plausible.” A plausible belief has a surface plausibility, which means that the idea could be true even though it hasn’t been proven. In other words, someone could believe something plausible without having any solid evidence for it.

Another way to say makes sense is “is reasonable.” A reasonable idea or belief falls in line with common sense and conventional wisdom. This expression has a similar meaning to plausible, but with an implicit comparison to other ideas that do not fall within these norms.

Another way to say makes sense is “has merit.” Someone who says this is implying that their idea is better than the alternatives. They might also be trying to persuade someone else of its worth.

Another phrase that would be a good match is “sounds about right”. This phrase has an informal tone and could be used by casual speakers to signify approval of someone else’s idea.

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Another way to say makes sense is “ring true.” This expression has a similar meaning to sound about right, but instead of being limited in tone, it can encompass anything from an agreement with what is being said to the experience of believing what you are hearing is true.

Another way to say makes sense is “leads me to believe.” This phrase would be used by speakers who want to express that the evidence leads them to a particular conclusion, but it still leaves some doubt in their minds.

Another expression that you could use is “seems right to me.” This phrase has a casual tone and would be appropriate for informal conversation. It can also be used in rhetorical situations where the speaker might want to elicit agreement from their audience.

Another way to say makes sense is “is plausible.” A plausible belief has a surface plausibility, which means that the idea could be true even though it hasn’t been proven. In other words, someone could believe something plausible without having any solid evidence for it.

Another way to say makes sense is “seems accurate.” Someone who says this might believe that the idea they are hearing is true, or they might be trying to persuade someone else of its worth.

Another way to say makes sense is “holds together.” This expression might be used by a speaker who feels insecure about their idea. It implies that the idea has a solid structure and would not fall apart if it were put under pressure.

Another way to say makes sense is “is cogent.” The word cogent means basically the same thing as making sense. It also carries a connotation of being carefully thought-out, logical, and persuasive.

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Someone who thinks something is logical or sensible might describe it as cogent.

Another way to say makes sense is “feels right.” This expression has an informal tone and could be used by casual speakers to signify approval of someone else’s idea. It can also be used in rhetorical situations where the speaker might want to elicit agreement from their audience.

Another way to say makes sense is “seems appropriate.” This phrase can be used in rhetorical situations where the speaker might want to elicit agreement from their audience. It also has a slightly more formal tone than making sense.

That falls in line with me works well as a replacement for makes sense. Someone who says this might be trying to convince someone else of their point, but it doesn’t carry the same level of conviction as saying makes sense.

Another way to say makes sense is “seems like a good idea.” This phrase has a casual tone and would be appropriate for informal conversation. It can also be used in rhetorical situations where

Another way to say makes sense is “is acceptable.” Someone who says this might be trying to persuade someone else of its worth, or they could believe that the idea they are hearing is true.

Another way to say makes sense is “struck me as accurate.” This phrase has a slightly more formal tone than making sense, and it can be used in rhetorical situations where the speaker might want to elicit agreement from their audience. It also implies that there still might be some doubt about the idea being presented.

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